Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Dynamics CRM Online’

Dynamics CRM: Query Builder Error

November 20th, 2013 Admin No comments

    I was experimenting with the etc (Entity Type Code) parameter in urls placed within the SiteMap.xml of my solution and deployed the solution with a non-existent etc to Dynamics CRM 2013 at Office 365. Unlike Dynamics CRM 2011 which just ignores this parameter, Dynamics CRM 2013 responded to me with a Query Builder Error, namely

The specified record type does not exist in Microsoft Dynamics CRM


Query Builder Error

The main pitfall here is that you don’t have a chance to go to any other pages and fix the problem because everything you get are the error message and the Try Again button which gives you a unique opportunity to see the error again :) But don’t rush to call support, try the following direct url to the Customization page:


https://yourOrganizationName.crm.dynamics.com/tools/systemcustomization/systemCustomization.aspx

* replace yourOrganizationName with your Organization name

Or for on-premise instances


http://yourServerName/yourOrganizationName/tools/systemcustomization/systemcustomization.aspx

* replace yourServerName and yourOrganizationName with your Server and Organization names respectively

System Customization Page

The Customization page itself doesn’t contain the navigation tiles that cause the Query Builder Error. So, through the page you’ll be able to manage installed packages and, like in my case, to remove the problem solution.

Dynamics CRM: How to add a map to an Entity form

November 13th, 2013 Admin No comments

    Let’s say we have an Entity with Latitude and Longitude attributes and we want to display a pushpin at this point on a map when opening the Entity‘s form. Briefly, I offer to add a section to the form (the section is a placeholder for the map) and bind the form’s OnLoad event to a custom JavaScript, which finds the section, adds Bing Map Control to it, gets Latitude and Longitude attributes of a current record and displays the appropriate point on the map.


1. Add JavaScript to Web Resources

Let’s assume we have the custom unmanaged solution named Test Solution that provides with the Bus Stop Entity containing Latitude and Longitude attributes. Open the solution and create a JavaScript (JScript) Web Resource with the code listed below. Read the comments within the code as they explain what happens inside.

//If the dotNetFollower namespace object is not defined, create it
if (typeof (dotNetFollower) == "undefined") {
    dotNetFollower = {};
}

dotNetFollower.BingMapLib = (function () {
    var self = this; // save reference to itself

	self.bingKey = "put here your key";
    self.map     = null; // map control
    self.mapDiv  = null; // div, a placeholder for Map Control   

	// dynamically adds a script to the page
    self.addScript = function(url, callback) {
		var script   = document.createElement('script');
		script.src   = url;
		script.type  = 'text/javascript';
		script.defer = false;

		if (typeof callback != "undefined" && callback != null) {

			// IE only, connect to event, which fires when JavaScript is loaded
			script.onreadystatechange = function() {
				if (this.readyState == 'complete' || this.readyState == 'loaded') {
					this.onreadystatechange = this.onload = null; // prevent duplicate calls
					callback();
				}
			}

			// FireFox and others, connect to event, which fires when JavaScript is loaded
			script.onload = function() {
				this.onreadystatechange = this.onload = null; // prevent duplicate calls
				callback();
			};
		}

		var head = document.getElementsByTagName('head').item(0);
		head.appendChild(script);
	};

	// checks if a passed string is Null or Empty
	self.isNullOrEmpty = function (str) {
        return !str || $.trim(str) === ""; // the trim method is provided by jQuery
    };

	// checks if Microsoft.Maps.Map is available
	self.scriptsReady = function () {
        return typeof (Microsoft)          != 'undefined' &&
        	   typeof (Microsoft.Maps)     != 'undefined' &&
        	   typeof (Microsoft.Maps.Map) != 'undefined' &&
        	   typeof (Xrm)                != 'undefined';
    };

	// adds a div to the section within the form, the div is supposed to host a Bing Map Control
	self.prepareMapPlaceholder = function() {
		var mapWidth  = '100%';
		var mapHeight = '400px';

		// get the section by label Map
		var section = $('table[label="Map"]');

		// if section isn't found, that could mean that we deal with
        // the CRM 2013. So, let's try to find the section using another selector
        if(section.length == 0)
        	section = $(":header:contains('Map')").parents("table");

        var td = section.find('td[colspan="2"]:last');		

		// add a div
		td.html('<div id="mapPlaceholder" style="width:' + mapWidth +
                '; height: ' + mapHeight + ';" />');
		self.mapDiv = td.find('#mapPlaceholder')[0];
	};

    // creates a Bing Map Control hosted in the passed args.div
    self.loadMap = function (args) {
    	// check if Microsoft.Maps.Map is available
        if (self.scriptsReady()) {

            if (self.map == null) {
                var div = $(args.div);

                // create a Bing Map Control
                self.map = new Microsoft.Maps.Map(args.div, {
                    credentials: self.bingKey,
                    showDashboard: false,
                    showMapTypeSelector: false,
                    showScalebar: false,
                    mapTypeId: Microsoft.Maps.MapTypeId.auto,
                    zoom: args.zoom,
                    width: div.parent().width(),
                    height: div.height(),
                    center: new Microsoft.Maps.Location(args.lat, args.lon),
                    enableSearchLogo: false,
                    enableClickableLogo: false
                });

                // hook up to resize event to adjust the map's size in time
                $(window).resize(function () {
                    self.map.setOptions({ width: div.parent().width(), height: div.height() });
                });
            }

            // call the callback
            args.callback();
        }
        else
        	// in spite of calling the loadMap function right away after
        	// the Bing Map script is loaded,
        	// the Microsoft.Maps.Map still may be undefined,
        	// so wait for a while in this case
            setTimeout(self.loadMap, 1000, args);
    };

    // displays a pushpin on the map
    self.showBusStop = function() {

	  self.prepareMapPlaceholder();

	  // dynamically add the Bing Map script
	  self.addScript("https://ecn.dev.virtualearth.net/mapcontrol/mapcontrol.ashx?v=7.0&s=1",
       function() {
		// this code is executed once the Bing Map script has been loaded

		// get lat/lon of the current record
		var lat  = Xrm.Page.getAttribute("testpub_latitude").getValue();
		var lon  = Xrm.Page.getAttribute("testpub_longitude").getValue();
        var zoom = 15;

        // if lat or/and lon are null or empty,
        // use the default location namely the center of the USA
        if(self.isNullOrEmpty(lat) || self.isNullOrEmpty(lon)) {
        	lat  = 39.8282;
        	lon  = -98.5795;
        	zoom = 1;
        }

        // create Map Control hosted in the self.mapDiv
		self.loadMap({lat: lat, lon: lon, zoom: zoom, div: self.mapDiv, callback: function() {

			// this code is executed once the Microsoft.Maps.Map gets defined

			// create a pushpin
			var location = new Microsoft.Maps.Location(lat, lon);
         	var pushpin  = new Microsoft.Maps.Pushpin(location);

         	// add the pushpin to the map
            self.map.entities.push(pushpin);
		}});
	  });
	};

    return self;
})();

The showBusStop function is an entry point that will be called on the Entity form’s OnLoad event (I’ll show later how to bind the event to the showBusStop). The showBusStop prepares the section for holding the map (how to add the section to the form will be described later as well) and dynamically includes the Bing Map script into the page by means of the addScript function described in details here – How to add a script-tag dynamically. Once the Bing Map script has been loaded, we get the Latitude and Longitude and initiate Map Control creation by calling the loadMap function. Note that the Bing Map script dynamically includes other scripts, and one of those is responsible for Microsoft.Maps.Map definition. So, the loadMap waits until the Microsoft.Maps.Map gets available by recalling itself through the setTimeout. Once the Map Control has been created, we create a pushpin and add it to the map.

The Map Control will adjust its width to fill the available space whenever the window’s size is changed.

The above script largely uses jQuery, so the jQuery has to be added to Web Resources as well. In my case the Web Resources have been named testpub_insertMap and testpub_jQuery respectively:

Crm Web Resources

2. Add a section to Entity form.

Open the Bus Stop Entity‘s main form for editing and add a One Column section, for example, to the General tab. Open the section’s properties (double click on the section) and set the Label property to Map (the word “Map” is used by the testpub_insertMap script to locate the section in the DOM tree). The picture below illustrates these steps:

Add Section To Entity Form

3. Bind Entity Form’s OnLoad event to the custom JavaScript function

Keep the Bus Stop Entity‘s main form open for editing and click on Form Properties. There first of all we need to make the custom scripts available on the form. Technically it means that our JavaScript Web Resources will be dynamically included into the page being loaded. So, in the Form Libraries section (at the Event tab), add testpub_jQuery and testpub_insertMap to the list. In our case, the order of the scripts is important: the testpub_jQuery must come first, i.e. be above the testpub_insertMap.

The second step is to specify what function from one of the added JavaScript Web Resources should be called on form’s OnLoad event. In the Event Handlers section, add a new event handler by choosing the testpub_insertMap as a Library and setting the dotNetFollower.BingMapLib.showBusStop as a Function. Note that no parameters are required to be passed into the dotNetFollower.BingMapLib.showBusStop. After these two steps you should have something like this:

Add Scripts To Entity Form OnLoad

If you have done everything right, the result view of the Bus Stop Entity‘s form should look like the following:

Map On Entity Form

The sample unmanaged solution you can download here – testsolution_1_0.zip

Dynamics CRM: Awaiting for Bulk Delete completion

October 29th, 2013 Admin No comments

    In my previous post I described my method for awaiting of async job completion. I have a similar one for awaiting Bulk Delete operation completion as well. Dealing with Bulk Delete we have to keep in mind the following: initiating the operation through the code, the GUID returned in the BulkDeleteResponse is not the id of the Bulk Delete operation, but the id of some async job; the target Bulk Delete operation will be created a bit later and will be associated with the async job; The code below illustrates the submitting of Bulk Delete request:

...
OrganizationServiceProxy proxy   = ...;
QueryExpression[]        queries = ...;

var bulkDeleteRequest = new BulkDeleteRequest
{
	JobName               = "Bulk Delete " + DateTime.Now,
	QuerySet              = queries,
	StartDateTime         = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-2), /* -2 is to avoid the problem with
                                                          local and utc times */
	ToRecipients          = new Guid[] {},
	CCRecipients          = new Guid[] {},
	SendEmailNotification = false,
	RecurrencePattern     = String.Empty
};        

var bulkDeleteResponse = (BulkDeleteResponse)proxy.Execute(bulkDeleteRequest);

// id of the job which will be associated with the Bulk Delete operation
Guid jobId = bulkDeleteResponse.JobId;

So, having id of the async job that will be shortly associated with the Bulk Delete operation, the awaiting process supposes two steps:

  • wait until the Bulk Delete operation has been created;
  • wait until the Bulk Delete operation has completed;

For both steps the RetrieveMultiple is repeatedly called against the bulkdeleteoperation records. Firstly, we try to find a record, the asyncoperationid attribute of which equals the async job id received before. Once the record has been found, it means the Bulk Delete operation has been created. Secondly, then we wait for the Bulk Delete operation completion.

The steps mentioned above have been implemented in the WaitForBulkDeleteCompletion method shown below. Like the WaitForAsyncJobCompletion, the WaitForBulkDeleteCompletion allows adjusting number of retries and sleep interval. It also analyses operation’s current state (and status) and provides actual progress on every iteration of the awaiting process.

public static BulkDeleteState WaitForBulkDeleteCompletion(OrganizationServiceProxy proxy,
														BulkDeleteAwaiting asyncJobAwaiting)
{
	var state = new BulkDeleteState();

	#if WRITE_TRACE_INFO
	WriteInfo(string.Format(@"Waiting for completion of the bulk
			delete associated with the Async Job {0}...", asyncJobAwaiting.AsyncJobId));
	#endif

	// Query for bulk delete operation and check for status.
	var bulkQuery = new QueryByAttribute(BulkDeleteOperation.EntityLogicalName)
		{
			ColumnSet = new ColumnSet(true)
		};
	bulkQuery.Attributes.Add("asyncoperationid");
	bulkQuery.Values.Add(asyncJobAwaiting.AsyncJobId);

	state.AsyncJobId        = asyncJobAwaiting.AsyncJobId;
	state.CurrentRetryCount = asyncJobAwaiting.Params.RetryCount;
	state.CurrentTimeout    = asyncJobAwaiting.Params.StartTimeout;

	do
	{
		Thread.Sleep(state.CurrentTimeout);

		EntityCollection entityCollection = proxy.RetrieveMultiple(bulkQuery);

		#if WRITE_TRACE_INFO
		WriteInfo(string.Format("Found {0} entities ...", entityCollection.Entities.Count));
		#endif

		if (entityCollection.Entities.Count > 0)
		{
			// Grab the one bulk operation that has been created.
			var createdBulkDeleteOperation = (BulkDeleteOperation)entityCollection.Entities[0];

			state.BulkDeleteOperationId = createdBulkDeleteOperation.BulkDeleteOperationId;
			state.CurrentState          = createdBulkDeleteOperation.StateCode;
			state.CurrentStatus         = createdBulkDeleteOperation.StatusCode != null ?
					(bulkdeleteoperation_statuscode)createdBulkDeleteOperation.StatusCode.Value :
					(bulkdeleteoperation_statuscode?) null;
			state.SuccessCount          = createdBulkDeleteOperation.SuccessCount;
			state.FailureCount          = createdBulkDeleteOperation.FailureCount;
		}

		#if WRITE_TRACE_INFO
		if (state.IsCreated)
		{
			if (state.IsSuspended)
				WriteInfo(string.Format("Bulk Delete (Id: {0}) is suspended", state.BulkDeleteOperationId));
			if (state.IsPaused)
				WriteInfo(string.Format("Bulk Delete (Id: {0}) is paused", state.BulkDeleteOperationId));
			if (state.CurrentState != null)
				WriteInfo(string.Format("Bulk Delete (Id: {0}) state is {1} {2}", asyncJobAwaiting.AsyncJobId, state.CurrentState, (state.CurrentStatus != null ? "(Status: " + state.CurrentStatus.Value + ")" : string.Empty)));

			WriteInfo(string.Format("{0} records were successfully deleted", state.SuccessCount ?? 0));
			WriteInfo(string.Format("{0} records failed to be deleted", state.FailureCount ?? 0));
		}
		else
			WriteInfo(string.Format("Bulk Delete is still not created. Associated Async Job Id:{0})", asyncJobAwaiting.AsyncJobId));
		#endif

		asyncJobAwaiting.FireOnProgress(state);

		if (asyncJobAwaiting.Params.TimeoutStep != null &&
		    asyncJobAwaiting.Params.EndTimeout != null &&
		    state.CurrentTimeout < asyncJobAwaiting.Params.EndTimeout)
				state.CurrentTimeout += asyncJobAwaiting.Params.TimeoutStep.Value;

		if (asyncJobAwaiting.Params.WaitForever)
			continue;

		if (state.IsSuspended && asyncJobAwaiting.Params.DoNotCountIfSuspended)
			continue;
		if (state.IsPaused && asyncJobAwaiting.Params.DoNotCountIfPaused)
			continue;
		if(!state.IsCreated && asyncJobAwaiting.Params.DoNotCountIfNotCreated)
			continue;

		state.CurrentRetryCount--;

	} while (!state.IsCompleted && state.CurrentRetryCount > 0);

	return state;
}

Classes involved in the method are derived from the same base classes as those used for WaitForAsyncJobCompletion. The diagram below demonstrates dependencies between the base classes and the ones specific for Bulk Delete operations.

Bulk Delete Waiting Class Diagram

The source code of the base classes AsyncOperationState, AsyncOperationAwaitingParams and AsyncOperationAwaiting are shown in the post – Awaiting for async job completion. The rest of used classes are listed below:

/// <summary>
/// Represents the awaiting parameters for Bulk Delete operations
/// </summary>
public class BulkDeleteAwaitingParams : AsyncOperationAwaitingParams
{
	private bool _doNotCountIfNotCreated = true;

	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if an iteration counts when the target Bulk Delete operation
	/// hasn't been created yet
	/// </summary>
	public bool DoNotCountIfNotCreated
	{
		get { return _doNotCountIfNotCreated; }
		set { _doNotCountIfNotCreated = value; }
	}
}

In comparison with the AsyncOperationAwaitingParams, I added one more property specifying whether retries are counted while Bulk Delete operation hasn’t been created yet.

/// <summary>
/// Represents parameters for tracking of a Bulk Delete operation
/// </summary>
public class BulkDeleteAwaiting : AsyncOperationAwaiting<BulkDeleteState,
													BulkDeleteAwaitingParams>
{
	/// <summary>
	/// Id of the async job that will be associated with the target Bulk Delete operation
	/// </summary>
	public Guid AsyncJobId
	{
		get { return _asyncOperationId; }
	}

	public BulkDeleteAwaiting(Guid asyncJobId, BulkDeleteAwaitingParams asyncJobAwaitingParams):
						base(asyncJobId, asyncJobAwaitingParams)
	{
	}
}

Note that the AsyncJobId here represents an auxiliary async job that is supposed to be associated with the target Bulk Delete operation.

/// <summary>
/// Represents current state of a Bulk Delete operation
/// </summary>
[Serializable]
public class BulkDeleteState : AsyncOperationState<BulkDeleteOperationState?,
												bulkdeleteoperation_statuscode?>
{
	/// <summary>
	/// Id of the async job associated with the target Bulk Delete operation
	/// </summary>
	public Guid  AsyncJobId            { get; set; }

	/// <summary>
	/// Id of the target Bulk Delete operation. Null when the operation isn't created.
	/// </summary>
	public Guid? BulkDeleteOperationId { get; set; }

	/// <summary>
	/// Current number of successfully deleted records
	/// </summary>
	public int?  SuccessCount          { get; set; }

	/// <summary>
	/// Current number of problem records
	/// </summary>
	public int?  FailureCount          { get; set; }

	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the Bulk Delete is suspended
	/// </summary>
	public override bool IsSuspended
	{
		get { return CurrentState != null &&
					CurrentState.Value == BulkDeleteOperationState.Suspended; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the Bulk Delete is paused
	/// </summary>
	public override bool IsPaused
	{
		get { return CurrentState != null &&
					CurrentState.Value == BulkDeleteOperationState.Locked &&
					CurrentStatus != null &&
					CurrentStatus.Value == bulkdeleteoperation_statuscode.Pausing; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the Bulk Delete is completed
	/// </summary>
	public override bool IsCompleted
	{
		get { return CurrentState != null &&
					CurrentState.Value == BulkDeleteOperationState.Completed; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the number of retries have run out while the Bulk Delete is
	/// still uncompleted
	/// </summary>
	public override bool IsTimedOut
	{
		get { return !IsCompleted && CurrentRetryCount <= 0; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the Bulk Delete is failed
	/// </summary>
	public override bool IsFailed
	{
		get { return CurrentStatus != null &&
					CurrentStatus.Value == bulkdeleteoperation_statuscode.Failed; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the Bulk Delete is created
	/// </summary>
	public bool IsCreated
	{
		get { return BulkDeleteOperationId != null &&
					BulkDeleteOperationId.Value != Guid.Empty; }
	}
}

The class represents a current state of the Bulk Delete operation being awaited. The current state on each iteration is supplied by the WaitForBulkDeleteCompletion through the OnProgress event available in the passed BulkDeleteAwaiting instance. In the end the WaitForBulkDeleteCompletion method returns the final state. The bulkdeleteoperation_statuscode enum is defined in the OptionSets.cs at sdk\samplecode\cs\helpercode.

All the source code can be downloaded here – ConnectToCrm4.zip

Related posts:

Dynamics CRM: Awaiting for async job completion

September 27th, 2013 Admin No comments

    Having initiated an async job through the code, it’s often needed to wait until the job is completed. A very simple method doing that could be found in SDK samples provided by Microsoft. The WaitForAsyncJobCompletion method is contained at SDK\SampleCode\CS\DataManagement\DataImport\BulkImportHelper.cs and used for awaiting of completion of async jobs participating in a bulk data import:

public static void WaitForAsyncJobCompletion(OrganizationServiceProxy serviceProxy,
                                                            Guid asyncJobId)
{
	ColumnSet cs = new ColumnSet("statecode", "statuscode");
	AsyncOperation asyncjob =
             (AsyncOperation)serviceProxy.Retrieve("asyncoperation", asyncJobId, cs);

	int retryCount = 100;

	while (asyncjob.StateCode.Value != AsyncOperationState.Completed && retryCount > 0)
	{
		asyncjob = (AsyncOperation)serviceProxy.Retrieve("asyncoperation", asyncJobId, cs);
		System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(2000);
		retryCount--;
		Console.WriteLine("Async operation state is " + asyncjob.StateCode.Value.ToString());
	}

	Console.WriteLine("Async job is " + asyncjob.StateCode.Value.ToString() +
		" with status " + ((asyncoperation_statuscode)asyncjob.StatusCode.Value).ToString());
}

This method is acceptable, but, as for me, it has some disadvantages. First of all, it’s better to have adjustable retryCount and sleep interval, so that to make them more suitable for each particular job. For example, if we know that an operation takes a very long time, we would extend the sleep interval and decrease max number of retries to minimize CPU time spent on checking of the job status. We could even make the waiting more adaptive and extend the sleep interval gradually: the more idle retries we have, the bigger the sleep interval gets. Secondly, the WaitForAsyncJobCompletion doesn’t analyze thoroughly the current state (and status) of the job. The job could be in Suspended or Paused state, in both cases, I think, it’s better not to count such retry as the job isn’t running at that moment. In addition, I would like to get some intermediate state on each iteration of the while-statement as it would allow tracing the job state changing in the time.

Based on the above weaknesses and wishes I’ve implemented my own WaitForAsyncJobCompletion method listed below:

#define WRITE_TRACE_INFO

using System;
using System.Threading;
using Microsoft.Xrm.Sdk.Client;
using Microsoft.Xrm.Sdk.Query;
...
public static AsyncJobState WaitForAsyncJobCompletion(OrganizationServiceProxy proxy,
                   AsyncJobAwaiting asyncJobAwaiting)
{
	var state = new AsyncJobState();

	#if WRITE_TRACE_INFO
	WriteInfo(string.Format("Waiting for async job (Id: {0}) completion ...",
                   asyncJobAwaiting.AsyncJobId));
	#endif

	var columnSet = new ColumnSet("statecode", "statuscode");

	state.AsyncJobId        = asyncJobAwaiting.AsyncJobId;
	state.CurrentRetryCount = asyncJobAwaiting.Params.RetryCount;
	state.CurrentTimeout    = asyncJobAwaiting.Params.StartTimeout;

	do
	{
		Thread.Sleep(state.CurrentTimeout);

		var asyncJob =
      (AsyncOperation)proxy.Retrieve("asyncoperation", asyncJobAwaiting.AsyncJobId, columnSet);

		state.CurrentState  = asyncJob.StateCode;
		state.CurrentStatus = asyncJob.StatusCode != null ?
          (asyncoperation_statuscode)asyncJob.StatusCode.Value : (asyncoperation_statuscode?)null;

		#if WRITE_TRACE_INFO
		if (state.IsSuspended)
			WriteInfo(string.Format("Async job (Id: {0}) is suspended", asyncJobAwaiting.AsyncJobId));
		if (state.IsPaused)
			WriteInfo(string.Format("Async job (Id: {0}) is paused", asyncJobAwaiting.AsyncJobId));
		if (asyncJob.StateCode != null)
			WriteInfo(string.Format("Async job (Id: {0}) state is {1} {2}", asyncJobAwaiting.AsyncJobId, asyncJob.StateCode.Value, (asyncJob.StatusCode != null ? "(Status: " + (asyncoperation_statuscode)asyncJob.StatusCode.Value + ")" : string.Empty)));
		#endif

		asyncJobAwaiting.FireOnProgress(state);

		if (asyncJobAwaiting.Params.TimeoutStep != null &&
            asyncJobAwaiting.Params.EndTimeout != null &&
            state.CurrentTimeout < asyncJobAwaiting.Params.EndTimeout)
			  state.CurrentTimeout += asyncJobAwaiting.Params.TimeoutStep.Value;

		if (asyncJobAwaiting.Params.WaitForever)
			continue;
		if (state.IsSuspended && asyncJobAwaiting.Params.DoNotCountIfSuspended)
			continue;
		if (state.IsPaused && asyncJobAwaiting.Params.DoNotCountIfPaused)
			continue;

		state.CurrentRetryCount--;

	} while (!state.IsCompleted && state.CurrentRetryCount > 0);

	return state;
}

public static void WriteInfo(string message)
{
	Console.WriteLine(message);
}

Note that the first thing I do in the while-statement is the sleeping for the current timeout value as I think It’s pointless to examine an async job for completion right after it has been created.

As you can see, this implementation is still quite simple, however it depends on a few classes referred to as parameters of waiting and current state of the target job. The diagram below depicts these assistant classes and their dependencies. If you wonder why I use inheritance and produced so many classes for a simple async job awaiting I can just say in excuse of this that the base classes are employed for keeping track of other operations as well (e.g. Bulk Delete operations).

Async Job Awaiting Class Diagram

The source code of the classes along with some explanations are shown below.

/// <summary>
/// Represents the awaiting parameters
/// </summary>
public class AsyncOperationAwaitingParams
{
	private const int DefaultTimeout    = 2000;
	private const int DefaultRetryCount = 100;

	private int  _startTimeout          = DefaultTimeout;
	private int  _retryCount            = DefaultRetryCount;
	private bool _doNotCountIfSuspended = true;
	private bool _doNotCountIfPaused    = true;

	/// <summary>
	/// If set, specifies the value to be added to the sleep timeout on each iteration
	/// </summary>
	public int? TimeoutStep { get; set; }
	/// <summary>
	/// If set, specifies the top limit of the sleep timeout
	/// </summary>
	public int? EndTimeout  { get; set; }

	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if we need to wait for the operation completeness eternally
	/// </summary>
	public bool WaitForever { get; set; }

	/// <summary>
	/// Specifies the initial and maximal number of iterations
	/// </summary>
	public int RetryCount
	{
		get { return _retryCount; }
		set { _retryCount = value; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Specifies the initial sleep timeout
	/// </summary>
	public int StartTimeout
	{
		get { return _startTimeout; }
		set { _startTimeout = value; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if an iteration counts when the operation is suspended
	/// </summary>
	public bool DoNotCountIfSuspended
	{
		get { return _doNotCountIfSuspended; }
		set { _doNotCountIfSuspended = value; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if an iteration counts when the operation is paused
	/// </summary>
	public bool DoNotCountIfPaused
	{
		get { return _doNotCountIfPaused; }
		set { _doNotCountIfPaused = value; }
	}
}

I added the WaitForever option just in case. However, I recommend avoiding the use of it as it’s better to play with RetryCount and sleep timeouts (EndTimeout, TimeoutStep, StartTimeout) and find the most suitable values for them for each specific type of operations.

/// <summary>
/// Comprises the awaiting parameters and id of the operation to be tracked.
/// Provides the OnProgress event supposed to be fired on each iteration of awaiting process.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="TState">Represents a type of the operation state</typeparam>
/// <typeparam name="TParams">Represents a type of the awaiting parameters</typeparam>
public abstract class AsyncOperationAwaiting<TState, TParams>
{
	protected readonly Guid    _asyncOperationId;
	protected readonly TParams _asyncOperationAwaitingParams;

	/// <summary>
	/// Represents the awaiting parameters
	/// </summary>
	public TParams Params
	{
		get { return _asyncOperationAwaitingParams; }
	}

	/// <summary>
	/// Event to fire and get operation state on each iteration
	/// </summary>
	public event EventHandler<TState> OnProgress;

	public void FireOnProgress(TState state)
	{
		if (OnProgress != null)
			OnProgress(this, state);
	}

	protected AsyncOperationAwaiting(Guid asyncOperationId, TParams asyncOperationAwaitingParams)
	{
		_asyncOperationId             = asyncOperationId;
		_asyncOperationAwaitingParams = asyncOperationAwaitingParams;
	}
}

The descendants of the AsyncOperationAwaiting are supposed to supply parameters for more specific operations like async jobs, Bulk Deletes and so on.

/// <summary>
/// Represents parameters for tracking of an async job
/// </summary>
public class AsyncJobAwaiting :
               AsyncOperationAwaiting<AsyncJobState, AsyncOperationAwaitingParams>
{
	/// <summary>
	/// Id of the async job
	/// </summary>
	public Guid AsyncJobId
	{
		get { return _asyncOperationId; }
	}

	public AsyncJobAwaiting(Guid asyncJobId, AsyncOperationAwaitingParams asyncJobAwaitingParams) :
        base(asyncJobId, asyncJobAwaitingParams)
	{
	}
}

The AsyncJobAwaiting supplies the awaiting parameters for async jobs. An instance of the AsyncJobAwaiting class is passed to the WaitForAsyncJobCompletion method.

/// <summary>
/// Represents current state of an operation
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="TState">Represents a type of the operation state</typeparam>
/// <typeparam name="TStatus">Represents a type of the operation status</typeparam>
[Serializable]
public abstract class AsyncOperationState<TState, TStatus>
{
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates how many retries remain
	/// </summary>
	public int  CurrentRetryCount    { get; set; }
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates sleep timeout on the last iteration
	/// </summary>
	public int  CurrentTimeout       { get; set; }

	/// <summary>
	/// Represents current operation state
	/// </summary>
	public TState  CurrentState      { get; set; }
	/// <summary>
	/// Represents current operation status
	/// </summary>
	public TStatus CurrentStatus     { get; set; }

	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the operations is suspended
	/// </summary>
	public abstract bool IsSuspended { get; }
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the operations is paused
	/// </summary>
	public abstract bool IsPaused    { get; }
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the operations is completed
	/// </summary>
	public abstract bool IsCompleted { get; }
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the number of retries have run out while the operation is still uncompleted
	/// </summary>
	public abstract bool IsTimedOut  { get; }
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the operations is failed
	/// </summary>
	public abstract bool IsFailed    { get; }
}

The descendants of the AsyncOperationState are supposed to be states for more specific operations like async jobs, Bulk Deletes and so on. The class is marked as Serializable, it gives us an ability to persist the state somewhere like logs, databases etc.

/// <summary>
/// Represents current state of an async job
/// </summary>
[Serializable]
public class AsyncJobState :
     AsyncOperationState<AsyncOperationState?, asyncoperation_statuscode?>
{
	/// <summary>
	/// Id of the async job
	/// </summary>
	public Guid AsyncJobId { get; set; }

	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the async job is suspended
	/// </summary>
	public override bool IsSuspended
	{
		get { return CurrentState != null &&
                     CurrentState.Value == AsyncOperationState.Suspended; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the async job is paused
	/// </summary>
	public override bool IsPaused
	{
		get { return CurrentState != null && CurrentState.Value == AsyncOperationState.Locked &&
             CurrentStatus != null && CurrentStatus.Value == asyncoperation_statuscode.Pausing; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the async job is completed
	/// </summary>
	public override bool IsCompleted
	{
		get { return CurrentState != null &&
                     CurrentState.Value == AsyncOperationState.Completed; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the number of retries have run out while the async job is still uncompleted
	/// </summary>
	public override bool IsTimedOut
	{
		get { return !IsCompleted && CurrentRetryCount <= 0; }
	}
	/// <summary>
	/// Indicates if the async job is failed
	/// </summary>
	public override bool IsFailed
	{
		get { return CurrentStatus != null &&
                     CurrentStatus.Value == asyncoperation_statuscode.Failed; }
	}
}

The class is a current state of the async job being tracked. The WaitForAsyncJobCompletion method returns the final state and provides the current state on each iteration through the OnProgress event available in the passed AsyncJobAwaiting instance. The asyncoperation_statuscode is defined in the OptionSets.cs that could be found at sdk\samplecode\cs\helpercode.

All the source code can be downloaded here – ConnectToCrm3.zip

Related posts:

Dynamics CRM: Import of several files to one CRM Entity at once = An item with the same key has already been added

September 10th, 2013 Admin No comments

    Importing data to CRM programmatically (so-called Bulk Import), we create an Import instance and then create one or more ImportFile instances associated with the Import and upload the files. Each ImportFile instance also has to be associated with an ImportMap. The subsequent Parse, Transform and ImportRecords operations are executed for all of the ImportFiles grouped under the Import. The size of a file that could be uploaded to CRM is limited. So, when I needed to import a huge number of records to a CRM Entity, I decided to split the file with the records into several ones satisfying the limitation. When the files of smaller size had been created and associated with one Import and one ImportMap, the data parsing was requested. Unfortunately, the records weren’t imported as the Import failed. I found the following exception thrown on the CRM server side:

Unhandled Exception: System.ArgumentException:
An item with the same key has already been added.
  at System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary`2.Insert(TKey key, TValue value, Boolean add)
  at Microsoft.Crm.Asynchronous.ImportHelperData.InitializeImportHelperData(Guid importId,
            Boolean initializeDictionaries, IOrganizationService crmService,
            Guid organizationId, Int32 languageCode)
  at Microsoft.Crm.Asynchronous.ImportHelperData..ctor(Guid importId,
            Boolean initializeDictionaries, IOrganizationService crmService,
            Guid organizationId, Int32 languageCode)
  at Microsoft.Crm.Asynchronous.ImportOperationParse.ExecuteImportOperation(
            Guid organizationId, Guid importId, Int32 operationType)
  at Microsoft.Crm.Asynchronous.ImportOperation.InternalExecute(AsyncEvent asyncEvent)

Having armed with .Net Reflector, I found the exact place where the exception had occurred. It’s the InitializeImportHelperData method of the ImportHelperData class defined in Microsoft.Crm.Asynchronous.DataManagement assembly. A bit simplified code of the InitializeImportHelperData is listed below:

private void InitializeImportHelperData(Guid importId, bool initializeDictionaries,
                     IOrganizationService crmService, Guid organizationId, int languageCode)
{
    this._crmService = crmService;
    this._importId = importId;
    ...
    RetrieveRequest request = new RetrieveRequest {
        ColumnSet = new ColumnSet(true),
        Target = new EntityReference("import", importId)
    };
    RetrieveResponse response = (RetrieveResponse) this._crmService.Execute(request);
    Entity entity = response.Entity;
    ...
    EntityCollection importFileCollection = this.RetrieveImportFiles(this._importId);
    this.ProcessImportFilesForImportEntityMappings(ref importFileCollection);
    this._importFileIdToImportFileObjectDictionary = new Dictionary<Guid, Entity>();
    if (initializeDictionaries)
    {
        this._sourceEntityToImportFileIdDictionary = new Dictionary<string, Guid>();
        this._importFileIdToImportFileHelperDataDictionary =
                              new Dictionary<Guid, ImportFileHelperData>();
    }
    foreach (Entity entity2 in importFileCollection.Entities)
    {
       Guid id = entity2.Id;
       this._importFileIdToImportFileObjectDictionary.Add(id, entity2);
       if (initializeDictionaries)
       {
          if (entity2.Attributes.Contains("sourceentityname") &&
                                       entity2["sourceentityname"] != null)
 /***/     this._sourceEntityToImportFileIdDictionary.Add(
              DataManagementHelper.GetStringFromDynamicEntity(entity2, "sourceentityname"), id);
          this._importFileIdToImportFileHelperDataDictionary.Add(id, null);
       }
    }
}

The exception is thrown in the highlighted line. This code gets the ImportFiles, goes through them and fills the dictionary with ImportFile Ids, using the SourceEntityName as a key. Obviously, if we have at least two ImportFiles with the same SourceEntityName (my case), we get the exception.

I was looking for a workaround and the first thought that came into my mind was to set different SourceEntityName for each ImportFile. However, SourceEntityName of ImportFile must coincide with the one specified in an associated ImportMap. I had one ImportMap for all of ImportFiles as they supply records for one CRM Entity. So, following this way, I would have to provide with as many almost identical ImportMaps as many ImportFiles are to be uploaded. The difference between the ImportMaps would be only in the SourceEntityName attribute. I discarded this idea as it’s extremely not optimal.

The approach I chose in the end is just to use an individual Import for every ImportFile. So, if you have a number of ImportFiles and each ImportFile is associated with a distinct ImportMap and supplies records for a distinct CRM Entity, you can combine them into one package (group under one Import instance). But if you are planning to import records from several ImportFiles to one and the same CRM Entity using one and the same ImportMap, use an individual package (separate Import instance) for every such file.

The fact that we are not able to import data from several files to a CRM Entity at once (i.e. using one Import package) is a very strange limitation for me. I hope this inconvenience will be fixed in upcoming CRM versions.